When content marketing goes wrong – and what to do about it

Given the increased focus on content marketing during the Covid-19 lockdown and resulting switch by consumers to increasing levels of online shopping, a recap on the pitfalls seems timely.

In 15 reasons why content marketing fails Doug Kessler outlines a list of familiar reasons why “saying anything” for the sake of it is no substitute for well-timed, considered communications which engage with the target audience.

A couple will seem very close to home for anyone who has tried to keep the conversation going through content, sometimes at any cost:

Number 2: “Staying the course Bad content can stem from a fear of pivoting: ‘I promised this, so I must deliver it.’ No. You learned something important on the way that changed your mind. Honour it and pivot. They’ll thank you.”

Number 9: “Fear of stealing The compulsion to be 100% original is hugely misguided and futile. Everybody steals. Even the people you steal from.”

Number 14: “Split persona syndrome A lot of crap content tries to do too much – telling different stories to different audiences. Target clash is a killer. Focus on one target audience.”

“There’s no single reason that good intentions turn into bland content. There are at least 40,” he adds.

You can find the full list, in its uncomfortable honesty, in the latest edition of Catalyst magazine the member publication for the CIM.